Training Grants

Neuroscience graduate students at NYU benefit from a number of NIH-funded institutional training grants. Although graduate students are guaranteed full support throughout their study, independent of their home program, we strongly encourage students to begin establishing a track record of independent funding as early as possible during their research careers. The following training grants are designed to support students across the two major neuroscience graduate programs at NYU.


Training Program in Neuroscience

The Training Program in Neuroscience supports 8 first or second year graduate students from the Center for Neural Science and the Graduate Program in Neuroscience and Physiology in the NYU School of Medicine Sackler Institute of Biomedical Sciences. This support comes from Jointly Sponsored NIH Predoctoral Training Program in the Neurosciences. This training program promotes the integration of the extensive neuroscience community at NYU. The specific goals of the neuroscience training program are:

  1. to provide a rigorous and broad-based graduate education in neuroscience within an interactive and collegial research environment,
  2. to increase the number of high caliber students that apply to and participate in the program, including active recruitment of underrepresented minorities,
  3. to provide students with guidance by a rigorous mentoring system through a series of milestones to a doctoral degree typically in 5-6 years,
  4. to build critical awareness by open discussion of problems associated with the scientific method and the interpretation of results as well as discussion of the ethical problems associated with scientific research,
  5. to provide a broad perspective on how training in neuroscience can allow students to make contributions in basic, translational, and clinical research, including access to detailed information concerning post-graduate career choices.  

The program brings together 86 faculty trainers from NYU's Faculty of Arts & Sciences and the School of Medicine. Their diverse research interests ensure broad training of graduate students in the fundamental principles of neuroscience as well as their application to basic and clinical research problems. Cohesiveness in the program is achieved through a comprehensive core curriculum as well as through seminars, symposia, journal clubs, tutorials, retreats, and extensive laboratory training. Each student is carefully mentored throughout their training to track progress.

Program Co-Directors:

Dr. Bernardo Rudy and Dr. Eric Klann


Training Program in Molecular, Cellular, and Translational Neuroscience

This training grant in Molecular, Cellular, and Translational Neuroscience, newly funded by NINDS, provides support for 4 advanced graduate students in their 3rd ,4th or 5th year of training from the Center for Neural Science and the Graduate Program in Neuroscience and Physiology in the NYU School of Medicine Sackler Institute of Biomedical Sciences.Training is tailored to facilitate independence, provide students with the tools to succeed in their final stage of graduate training, and prepare them for the next stage of their scientific careers.

The major goals of the training grant are to ensure trainees receive:

  • Focused, advanced coursework in molecular, cellular, and translational neuroscience that will prepare trainees for interdisciplinary scientific research, including coursework in the Assembly and Function of Neural Circuits
  • Excellent laboratory research opportunities in this focus area
  • Training in critical professional skills outside the laboratory, especially critical reading, grant writing, oral presentation, leadership, management, and networking skills
  • Careful mentoring that includes individual development plans (IDP's) and regular one-on-one mentoring meetings

Program Director

Dr. Jeremy Dasen


Integrative Neuroscience Training Program in Learning, Memory, Development and Plasticity

The training program in Integrative Neuroscience is a partnership between the Center for Neural Science, in the Faculty of Arts and Science, and the Graduate Program in Neuroscience and Physiology, in the NYU School of Medicine Sackler Institute of Biomedical Sciences, at New York University. Funding for the program comes from the National Institute of Mental Health. The focus of the training program is on four interrelated core areas of investigation: learning, memory, development and plasticity. We offer support for 4 predoctoral and 2 postdoctoral fellows. The goal of the program is to create a cohesive training group of a sufficient size to foster trainee development across levels, from pre to post-doctoral and from cellular-molecular to systems and cognitive approaches, across program divisions, and to bridge the gap between translational and basic research.

Our training program provides a central focus for pre and postdoctoral training in areas of neuroscience critical to advancing knowledge of development and degeneration of the nervous system, neural disease processes, and disorders of memory and mental health. Our trainees will be mentored to become leaders in the field by world class scientists engaged in cutting-edge research related to learning, memory, development and plasticity. A group of 25 training faculty, drawn from neuroscience faculty across the University, provide an integrative, collaborative training experience that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries, spans levels of analysis, and levels of training. The trainees, predoctoral fellows in the third year or higher and postdoctoral fellows in the early years post-degree, have individualized mentoring with the added benefit of a mentor with relevant clinical/translational expertise. They also have special seminars that are designed to develop translational thinking and important skills required for future success.

Features:

  • Stipend support for up to two years
  • Support for travel to one meeting per year
  • Coursework in Disorders of the Nervous System
  • Special seminar series designed to provide trainees with broad access to research related to the theme areas: learning, memory, development and plasticity, from both clinical and basic science perspectives and foster discussions and collaborations.
  • Individualized mentoring and career guidance
  • Translational research advising
  • Training in grant writing, publication practices, survival skills, presentation skills, scientific ethics

Program Director

Dr. Lynne Kiorpes


Training Program in Visual Neuroscience

The Visual Neuroscience Training Program supports students from the Center for Neural Science and from the Cognition and Perception program within the Department of Psychology. It has launched and shaped the careers of many who have made important contributions to the field. The 17 faculty of the training program seek to understand the visual system from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, and their goal is to understand the visual system as an integrated network of neurons that communicate signals from the eye to the brain centers responsible for perception and visually guided action. Fundamental questions of visual system function and organization addressed by the program's faculty include:

  • How do neural systems process information from the visual world?
  • How are visual neural systems organized to make decisions?
  • How are representations of visual events and episodes stored in neural tissue?
  • How are these stored representations used to plan visually guided actions?
  • How are actions coordinated?
  • Brain imaging of visual function
  • Cellular, molecular and genetic studies of visual function
  • Neurophysiology of central visual pathways
  • Visual psychophysics and behavior
  • Visual control of movement
  • Visual development
  • Computational and theoretical visual neuroscience

Program Director

Dr. J. Anthony Movshon 


Training Program in Computational Neuroscience

This new NIH training grant in Computational Neuroscience aims at training graduate students in theory and computational modeling across levels (from molecules, cells and circuits to functions and behavior). It is highly cross-disciplinary, supporting research in basic neuroscience as well as promising areas at the interface with psychiatry or artificial intelligence. The training grant provides support for 5 graduate students the Center for Neural Science and the Graduate Program in Neuroscience and Physiology in the NYU School of Medicine Sackler Institute of Biomedical Sciences. Support is for one year or multiple years, in students’ 2nd through 5th year of training. The specific goals of the training grant include:

  • Focused, advanced coursework in neuroscience, computational theory and modeling, data science, computational psychiatry, machine learning, and artificial intelligence.
  • Excellent laboratory research opportunities in this focus area, with more than 30 training faculty.
  • Training in critical professional skills outside the laboratory, especially critical reading, grant writing, oral presentation, leadership, management, and networking sills.
  • Careful mentoring that includes individual development plans and regular one-on-one mentoring meetings.
  • Small-group training in computational techniques
  • Computational neuroscience journal club preceding each Swartz seminar
  • Annual conference

Program Director

Dr. Xiao-Jing Wang and Dr. Wei Ji Ma